Employee retention: 4 golden rules to follow 1

Melissa is a mother of 2, lives in Utah, and writes for a multitude of sites. She is currently the EIC of HarcourtHealth.com and writes about health, wellness, and business topics.

It would be fair to say that workplace cultures have turned on their head over recent years.

Once upon a time hierarchy was the thing that made a workplace ticked – and there were no arguments. Now, such an approach is frowned upon and it means that employees are valued more than ever before.

Of course, some companies do this better than others. This is what today’s article is going to concentrate on, as we take a look at four rules that your firm must follow if you are serious about keeping your best employees.

Shout about your company whenever possible

Perhaps surprisingly, this is one of those things that few companies actually do enough of. In other words, they may shout from the rooftops about their brand during the hiring process, but as soon as a person becomes an employee everything goes a little quiet.

Admittedly, it can be difficult to talk positively about your firm without sounding too pushy. Technology is making this a little easier though and one only has to check out Zest’s benefits platform to see this in its full form. Systems like this allow you to really highlight the benefits that your company can offer and remind employees why you are the right fit for them.

Set regular reviews

What is the definition of regular? This will vary depending on the type of business you are involved in, but quarterly usually works the best.

Most companies think that these reviews are only beneficial internally but if they are done properly, they can be truly valued by employees. It’s here where they feel as though someone is truly listening to them, and it’s also here where they can set their own career goals. Ultimately, this can be the environment where they see that they are valued, and this is the company for them.

Get into the modern era with flexibility

It was almost a taboo subject several years ago, but now flexible working is almost concerned as normal. In fact, from a legal perspective your company might be obliged to offer it, so this is something that you need to be tackling head-on.

In short, if you don’t provide flexible working, you are lagging behind competitors. More and more are offering this, and some employees place a higher preference on flexibility over things like their salary.

It starts with the hiring process

Finally, while the tips so far have looked at what you should do when your employee has joined your company, there’s another piece to the jigsaw.

Ultimately, if you don’t make the right decisions in the hiring process, your chances of retaining employees diminish substantially.

Sometimes, it’s not about a candidate’s qualifications, but more about their personality. Some people are “too corporate” and won’t suit a relaxed working environment, while vice-versa also occurs. In other words, make sure you are getting the right people in to boost your retention rates and make people remain at your company for the long-term.